02 October 2011

Stacey Kent - Les eaux de Mars




"Waters of March" (Portuguese: "Águas de Março") is a Brazilian song composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim. Jobim wrote both the English and Portuguese lyrics.[1] The lyrics, originally written in Portuguese, do not tell a story, but rather present a series of images that form a collage; nearly every line starts with "É..." ("[It] is...").[1] In 2001, "Águas de Março" was named as the all-time best Brazilian song in a poll of more than 200 Brazilian journalists, musicians and other artists conducted by Brazil's leading daily newspaper, Folha de São Paulo.[1]

The inspiration for "Águas de Março" comes from Rio de Janeiro's rainiest month. March is typically marked by sudden storms with heavy rains and strong winds that cause flooding in many places around the city. The lyrics and the music have a constant downward progression much like the water torrent from those rains flowing in the gutters, which typically would carry sticks, stones, bits of glass, and almost everything and anything. The orchestration creates the illusion of the constant descending of notes much like Shepard tones.

In both the Portuguese and English versions of the lyrics, "it" is a stick, a stone, a sliver of glass, a scratch, a cliff, a knot in the wood, a fish, a pin, the end of the road, and many other things, although some specific references to Brazilian culture (festa da cumeeira, garrafa de cana), flora (peroba do campo) and folklore (Matita Pereira) were intentionally omitted from the English version, perhaps with the goal of providing a more universal perspective. All these details swirling around the central metaphor of "the waters of March" can give the impression of the passing of daily life and its continual, inevitable progression towards death, just as the rains of March mark the end of a Brazilian summer. Both sets of lyrics speak of "the promise of life," perhaps allowing for other, more life-affirming interpretations, and the English contains the additional phrases "the joy in your heart" and the "promise of spring," a seasonal reference that would be more relevant to most of the English-speaking world.

When writing the English lyrics, Jobim endeavoured to avoid words with Latin roots, which resulted in the English version having more verses than the Portuguese. Nevertheless, the English version still contains some words from Latin origin, such as rhyme, promise, dismay, line, plan, rest, pain, mountain, distance and mule. Another way in which the English lyrics differ from the Portuguese is that the English version treats March from the perspective of an observer in the northern hemisphere. In this context, the waters are the "waters of defrost" in contrast to the rains referred to in the original Portuguese, marking the end of summer and the beginning of the colder season in the southern hemisphere.

The song was used by Coca-Cola for a jingle in the mid-1980s concurrent with the "Coke is it!" campaign, which ran until 1988, and was most recently the track for a 2008 British Gas advert in the UK and in Italy. In the Philippines, it was also used in the early 90s as the soundtrack for an advertising campaign for the newly developed Ayala Center.[2]

Composer-guitarist Oscar Castro-Neves[3] relates that Jobim told him that writing in this kind of stream of consciousness was his version of therapy and saved him thousands in psychoanalysis bills.

Prof. Charles A. Perrone, an authority on contemporary Brazilian popular music (Musica Popular Brasiliera -MPB), wrote about the song in his doctoral dissertation (1985), an abridged version of which was published in Brazil as Letras e Letras da MPB (1988). He notes such sources for the song as the folkloric samba-de-matuto and a classic poem of pre-Modernist Brazilian literature.

extracted from wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waters_of_March

This song in this video is in French "Les eaux de Mars".

3 comments:

  1. Elis_Regina Version.

    Águas de Março, de Tom Jobim, imortalizada pela genial Elis!
    P&B
    Programa Ensaio, TV Cultura

    É pau, é pedra, é o fim do caminho
    É um resto de toco, é um pouco sozinho
    É um caco de vidro, é a vida, é o sol
    É a noite, é a morte, é um laço, é o anzol
    É peroba do campo, é o nó da madeira
    Caingá, candeia, é o Matita Pereira

    É madeira de vento, tombo da ribanceira
    É o mistério profundo, é o queira ou não queira
    É o vento ventando, é o fim da ladeira
    É a viga, é o vão, festa da cumeeira
    É a chuva chovendo, é conversa ribeira
    Das águas de março, é o fim da canseira
    É o pé, é o chão, é a marcha estradeira
    Passarinho na mão, pedra de atiradeira

    É uma ave no céu, é uma ave no chão
    É um regato, é uma fonte, é um pedaço de pão
    É o fundo do poço, é o fim do caminho
    No rosto o desgosto, é um pouco sozinho

    É um estrepe, é um prego, é uma conta, é um conto
    É uma ponta, é um ponto, é um pingo pingando
    É um peixe, é um gesto, é uma prata brilhando
    É a luz da manhã, é o tijolo chegando
    É a lenha, é o dia, é o fim da picada
    É a garrafa de cana, o estilhaço na estrada
    É o projeto da casa, é o corpo na cama
    É o carro enguiçado, é a lama, é a lama

    É um passo, é uma ponte, é um sapo, é uma rã
    É um resto de mato, na luz da manhã
    São as águas de março fechando o verão
    É a promessa de vida no teu coração

    É uma cobra, é um pau, é João, é José
    É um espinho na mão, é um corte no pé
    É um passo, é uma ponte, é um sapo, é uma rã
    É um belo horizonte, é uma febre terçã
    São as águas de março fechando o verão
    É a promessa de vida no teu coração

    ReplyDelete